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Expressions

(deadCL Syntax)


Expressions are used to aid object interpretation and help denote variables and constants.

They're frequently seen throughout deadCL Libraries, Conversations & Author Keys - if you have any questions best to visit our Community hub.





{   }

Contents treated as authoritative, largely reserved for inputs & output strings but not exclusive.

Examples



Within deadCL we use {   } to inform when an object is to be treated as authoritative over another, or should be treated (generally) as having more authority.



For example we use {   } to affix a value to a KC's or object.

Here a single authoritative meaning for 'minute' is set over any others applicable - rendering the need for the inclusion of DAW_2018 unnecessary.

minute; {a period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of an hour} $_T.M


We could also use {   } to provide an authoritative meaning - supported by object data.

Supporting information should always be listed after.

cookie; {a sweet biscuit} sample, @cookie-0.png sample, @cookie-1.png sample, @cookie-2.png actual, @cookie-actual-0.png actual, @cookie-actual-1.png actual, @cookie-actual-2.png


Depending on the POST technique we may need an authoritative statement, we could achieve this by using {   }

ACTION; {//POST 'LIVE' output}



?

Request object or action

Examples



Within deadCL we use ? to request an object or initiate an action. The command immediately after is tied to the request.



For example we use ? to initiate a POST request (in this case 'request drop') within a Library;

?DRP -- {//POST '$_FIF' output}



^

Root command

Examples



Within deadCL we use ^ to run a command or action as root.



For example we use ^ If we need to interrupt the flow of a deadCL Conversation.

In this example we used ^STOP to stop deadCL from actioning a Conversation logic.

^STOP



//

Used to link a qualified address with a command

Examples



Within deadCL we use // to link an address (this could be a URL or object address) to a object command.


For example we use // when posting from a Library (although not exclusively).

In this instance we're 'linking' our authorisation to the post address 'POST'

{//POST '$' output}


We could also request object information from an address, assuming the object 'PULLING' has an address value.

?// PULLING



{!important}

Object(s) are important

Examples



Within deadCL we use {!important} to set the importance of objects.



For example we use {!important} to set the syntax used to easily arrange importances of object(s).

By default this command is applied, however we may override it within a Library by utilising a rewrite (this method is used within certain offical Libraries).

'; {!important}



'   '

object contained is treated as {!important}

Examples



Within deadCL we use '   ' to set when an object or objects are more important than others within the same class.



For example we use '   ' to set the importance of a list of names

Matt, Matthew, 'Matty'


We can also use '   ' to inform of the resulting object value.

SET _VAL AS; 1, 2, 3, 4 on #5 as 'THE_WORD'



trusted_Cnvrstn

Explicit approval statement for linked object

Examples



Within deadCL we use trusted_Cnvrstn as a single instruction within an Author Key to inform deadCL that the linked conversation is trustable.



For example we use trusted_Cnvrstn denote that a conversation is trustworthy.

denied_Cnvrstn//@apple.dead



denied_Cnvrstn

Explicit denial statement for linked object

Examples



Within deadCL we use denied_Cnvrstn as a single instruction within an Author Key to inform deadCL that the linked conversation is untrustworthy.



For example we use denied_Cnvrstn denote that a conversation is untrustworthy.

denied_Cnvrstn//@[email protected]



[email protected]

Denial statement any object resource not explicitly approved

Examples



Within deadCL we use [email protected] to prevent any Conversation from being loaded against the Author Key.



For example we use [email protected] to denote that all conversations are untrustworthy - unless they've been explicitly trusted.



/recall

Recall statement

Examples



Within deadCL we use /recall to recall object information from another source or elsewhere within the same deadCL Program.



For example we use /recall at the end of every Library to make a universal recall to deadCL's OUP (Oxford University Press) index (review DAW_2018).

/recall -- Oxford University Press



/RW

Rewrite an Object, variable statement

Examples



Within deadCL we use /RW to rewrite an object statement without the need to interpret its value first.


For example we use /RW to change the object value from one state to another

This can useful when shifting information within an array.

FF.0 _all /RW FF.1



_VAL

Sets value of object

Examples



Within deadCL we use _VAL to set the value of an object (or objects)



For example we use _VAL to set the object of 'bobby' with the value of $_WRD


bobby; set _VAL '$_WRD'



bnd

change status of an object(s)

Examples



Within deadCL we use bnd to change the state of an object this is often to 'bind' or lock the object state to one or more values.



For example we use bnd to set the value of hook as the values #01 to #07


HOOK; bnd _VAL #01 -- #07



_all

All recursive mentions or actions, where permitted

Examples



Within deadCL we use _all to capture all recursive mentions of the same object or variable (where applicable)



For example we use _all to allow every object value of 'OB.D' to be set as FF.D


OB.D _all to FF.D



-L

Local object, unsigned by DeadLetter

Examples



Within deadCL we use -L to change how the attribute following is treated - we also use -L to indicate when a resource is unsigned by DeadLetter.



For example we use -L to change the value of @ when performing a request.

In other words deadCL will first perform a lookup within your local definition for @

-L @LOCAL.dead



-R

Remote object, Trusted and signed by DeadLetter

Examples



Within deadCL we use -R to change how the attribute following is treated - we also use -R to indicate when a resource is signed & trusted by DeadLetter.



For example we use -R to change the value of @ when performing a request.

In other words deadCL will only perform lookups at *.deadletter.io

-R @DEAD.dead



^disable_all

When inserted into an Author Key it disables all root commands for connected Conversations

Examples



Within deadCL we use ^disable_all to prevent any root commands from being executed.



For example we use ^disable_all to prevent root commands from functioning simply insert ^disable_all into your Author Key towards the bottom.

^disable_all



.PLL

Used to retrieve, or pull object(s)

Examples



Within deadCL we use .PLL to retrieve object information across libraries & seperate data repositories.

Generally reserved for Arrays.


For example we use .PLL to pull objects from one Library into another for interruption

.PLL //@lib.dead


We can also use.PLL to 'load' objects from else where

.PLL @ID_ DAW_2019 'WORD', 'red'



.DRP

Used to remove/discard or drop object(s)

Examples



Within deadCL we use .DRP to remove, or discard object information



For example we use .DRP to drop an object to enable a POST request - this can be risky as their is no way to recover the object data, should it fail.

.DRP //$_PST


We can also use .DRP to remove unwanted object data, for example here we'll drop every value greater than '8'

.DRP _all -- .GTO '8' VALUES



.LST

Used to list object(s) requested, when the execution order is important

Examples



Within deadCL we use .LST create sets of objects when the execution order is vital

Generally reserved for Arrays.


For example we use .LST to organise objects into a fixed list.

.LST #12, #02, #90



.OVRIDE

Used to override an existing object state/interpretation

Examples



Within deadCL we use .OVRIDE to override an existing object state/interpretation

Generally reserved for Arrays.


We can also use.OVRIDE to force a change in an objects state.

In this instance we're forcibly changing 00,00 to 00.30 regardless of its impact on the Array.

.OVRIDE -- VAL 00,00 {00.30}