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Substitutions

(deadCL Syntax)


deadCL uses substitutions to replace 'bulky' attributes and allow fast replacement or alteration at scale.

They're frequently seen throughout deadCL Libraries & Author Keys - if you have any questions best to visit our Community hub.





@

Substitution for a fully qualified domain name (FQDN)

Examples



Within deadCL we use @ to shorten FQDN (fully qualified domain names) & deadID’s the instruction is always linked to a Conversation level KC’s or more commonly an Author Key.



For example we use @ to shorten the deadID for both remote and local libraries;

(However in this example -L & -R modify how @ requests are treated, with -R forcing lookups at Libs.deadletter.io while -L will first perform a lookup within your local definition for @)

Catch-lib -L @LOCAL-LIBRARY-DEAD-ID Catch-lib -R @REMOTE-LIBRARY-DEAD-ID


Given the structure of deadCL requiring open access abstracting address information may be important therefore you can remove direct addressing, for example; in this case the @ will be defined within the Author Key, unless mentioned at the start of the library;

cookie; {a sweet biscuit} sample, @cookie-0.png sample, @cookie-1.png sample, @cookie-2.png actual, @cookie-actual-0.png actual, @cookie-actual-1.png actual, @cookie-actual-2.png


We can also use it to set Library specify addressing by including, this informs deadCL that any mentions thereafter will be the value defined - it must be the first command within the Library;

@; https://dld.domain.com/



@ID_

Prompt for Author key evaluation

Examples



Within deadCL we use @ID_ to shorten FQDN & deadID’s for official/DeadLetter maintained assets - in other words object information hosted upon deadCL repositories (*.deadletter.io)

This can be a valuable tool - DeadCL has no need to know where object data is, or Library flies are provided you know it’s Official name.



For example we use @ID_ to load object information within a Library;

WORDS; @ID_ DAW_2019



$_ word

Substitution for variable object(s)

Examples



Within deadCL we use $_word to create substitutional values where the ‘word’ is the changeable value while retaining a human readable fixed value - to simply to shorten longer strings of object information.



For example we use $_ If we need to separately interpret an object it can be advantageous to give it a variable value.

In this example we’ve given the all inputted information a $_ value

@in.dead; $_ins



word*

When placed after a word it defines that every value shall be treated as equal (i.e fee & fees)

Examples



Within deadCL we use word* to apply a change of object value to every variation of a word. The use most potent with MBS


For example we use word* if we were creating rules fo a conversation bot we may need to group word meanings;

Price*; €90 - small €180 - large



('   ')

The contents is a deadID address, and can be access as an offical DeadLetter resource, by name rather than a fully qualified address

Examples



Within deadCL we use ('   ') to aid in the identification of deadID’s due to the make up of deadCL to mitigate poor addressing in MBS we use ('   ') to label ID’s



For example we use ('   ') to set our dld.keyset value in every conversation, we use (‘   ‘) in-case the programmer scripts solely in MBS

dld.keyset('YOUR-AUTHOR-KEY-NAME')



Do-ID:

Sets the words (spaces recorded as _ underscores) after the : as your DeadLetter Offical ID

Examples



Within deadCL we use Do-ID: to offer a secondary authentication method, within your AK your Key Name is set - as a result you may insert ‘Do-ID’ in place of your key Name in certain situations.



For example we use Do-ID: to create different POST addresses when translated;

POST; do-ID + {DEAD.dead}



[email protected]

Common qualified address, this is used to define the root address (generally reserved for Author Keys)

Examples



Within deadCL we use [email protected] as a substitution for your Author Key deadID (or FQDN) this provides extra layer of protection - you can also change the address to your Author Key readily without modifying every files requiring lookups.

[email protected] should only be present if the Conversation or Library has been informed to look for specify information contained in your Author Key.


For example we use [email protected] to list the ‘master’ address contained within the Author Key

[email protected]{ https://dld.domain.com/root.dead}


[email protected] will also appear if you’re planing to load a resource from your Author Key - useful for when you want to ‘hide’ information but make your library publicly available.



>

Leading into, or to connect natural language

Examples



Within deadCL we use > to ‘lead apart of natural language into another, the rule is commonly applied within our Natural Language Libraries,



For example we use > sparingly within Libraries that deal predominantly with natural language (not MBS) for instances;

(Here we’re highlighting the connection between you the subject and the action in a grammatical sense.)

about people in general > speaker



=

Equals

Examples



Within deadCL we use = to indicate something equals (has the value) mentioned afterwards.



For example we use = (in this context) to inform the fixed object value of ‘Oracle as an ‘important’ American company.

Oracle = USA ‘listed’ LLC


Another example would be abbreviations;

Dr. = doctor Arr. = arrival etc. = etcetera



.GTO

The value is greater than 'x'

Examples



Within deadCL we use .GTO to indicate if an object has a value greater than another.



For example we use .GTO if we have a list of assets and need only the value greater than X

In this particular example we're using numbers (0 to 99) we can use .GTO discard every number less than 80;

DRP _all -- .GTO '80'



.LTO

The value is less than 'x'

Examples



Within deadCL we use .LTO to indicate if an object has a value less than another.



For example we use .LTO if we have a list of assets and need only the value greater than X

In this particular example we're using numbers (0 to 99) we can use .GTO discard every number greater than 80;

DRP _all -- .GTO '80'